In the state of New Jersey, the court looks at several factors to determine the amount of child support a parent should pay.

However, changes happen throughout life. For example, if you experience a career change that affects your salary, the financial contribution you make to support your son or daughter may be affected, too.

How child support works

The term “child support” refers to the payments a non-custodial parent makes to the parent who has custody of their child and undertakes most of the childrearing responsibilities. Court-ordered payments are made as part of the divorce agreement, but over time, circumstances may change for the non-custodial parent, which may necessitate a change in the payment amount.

New Jersey guidelines

In the state of New Jersey, the court uses a formula to determine child support and several factors are included:

  •         The income of each parent
  •         Living arrangement for the child
  •         Daycare expenses
  •         Cost of medical insurance
  •         Social Security benefits available
  •         Any other relevant factors

Covering necessities

Monthly child support payments are intended to cover the basic necessities, such as food, shelter and clothing. The court will also consider, among other factors, the cost of medical insurance that covers the child, education expenses, child care expenses and travel costs pertaining to child visitation.

Where your new job comes in

You have decided to make a career change because there are good possibilities for a future management position at a new company. However, your starting salary will be less than what you make in your current position. An experienced family law attorney will tell you that thorough preparation will be key in petitioning the court for the change you request relative to a reduction in the amount of your child support payment. Your financial standing may improve over time, and you can petition the court again if you are able to make larger payments. Also, keep in mind that in New Jersey, a judge automatically reviews an order for child support every three years.